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When For Better Becomes For Worse

April 30, 2016

“ I am back at home and times are hard. Brian treats me a lot like a child. He questions most things I do. He is always filtering what I say because I could be manic. I had a date planned and had a babysitter. Brian wanted me to cancel, so I did. He wants me in bed early. That fanned the anxiety flame and put me in the process of shutting down. I worry people will treat me like this broken person forever. It is devastating. Sometimes I just want to give up and be the person everyone thinks I am. It is hard to be making progress and to have people treating me this way.”

Dealing with mental illness is hard enough on its own, but dealing with a marriage in the midst of mental illness is extremely trying.  My husband and I were in a really good place before my brother passed away. We were tired but excited to welcome our fourth child. My health, however, immediately began to fail after Hunter died.  It was scared for Brian. He would tell me that I had lost my brother but he had lost his wife. When my mental illness started, I went to a very dark place very quickly. I became incompetent. I couldn’t take care of my children or myself. I needed someone with me at all times, to keep me from hurting myself. I essentially became a fifth child for my husband. He was alone. 

When I first became sick, he didn’t want to see it. It was too painful. He didn’t want to believe I needed help. I persisted, however, in asking for treatment. I knew something was wrong. Once I went into the hospital, I felt like I lost all dignity. I was no longer a wife but felt viewed as a child. The respect we once had was lost. My decisions and things I said were no longer trusted. When I returned home,  he didn’t trust me to watch the kids or be alone. He required that I complete all of my self-care activities or he feared I would fall apart. He kept inventory of what I did and how I did it. Always watching for signs of another spiral. I had to have eight hours of sleep, three meals a day, read my Bible, exercise, color my mandalas, and use my Emwave. 

I no longer felt like a wife, it was so painful. The pinnacle of this was when I scheduled a date night for us and he made me cancel so I could be in bed on time. I felt like a shadow of my former self. It was so trying. It actually made my sickness worse, in some ways. I further diminished my hope and gave me a reason to live. It made me fearful life would never be the same. I longed to be the Nurse Practitioner, wife, mother, and sister I had been. From where I sat, then, it looked like it may never happen again. I said  goodbye to a future self and became completely engrossed in my current circumstances. Only time would begin to heal these broken places.

What I Wish People Knew About Suicide

Suicide is something that scares people. You friend, mother, brother, colleague slips into depression. The next thing you know, they are suicidal. It seems so intimidating, unknown. You feel you don’t have the words to say or you are worried you will say or do the wrong thing. I want to share some insight from my time struggling with suicidal thoughts to help give you some information that may help someone you know.

Don’t abandon your loved one – The worst thing you can do to someone struggling with suicidal thoughts is to abandon them, withdraw. People don’t usually commit suicide when other people are present. Your abandon just makes their shame and pain greater. It reinforces that no one cares and people wouldn’t miss them if they were gone. Go sit with them, watch a movie, just let them talk. 

Don’t try to tell them why they shouldn’t commit suicide – When someone is in that dark and deep a place, telling them not to will go in one ear and out the other. Stay away from things like, “how could you think about doing this to your family, don’t you care about us, suicide is selfish.” These common comments do not register because this person’s brain is no longer thinking rationally. Let them know that you don’t know what they are going through but you see their pain and you are here for them no matter what.

If you suspect someone is suicidal, talk to them directly before you go behind their back – Not everyone who is self harming is suicidal. These are two totally different situations. Some people cut themselves to release pain or to allow themselves to feel something, as the numbness sets in. You can simply ask the person if they are suicidal. If they say no, you can ask them to explain how they are feeling. If they say yes, you can ask if they have a plan. Having a plan makes it much more likely the person will carry out their suicide. At that point, you need to encourage that person to seek a professional counselor and a psychiatrist. A general practitioner is not specialized enough to handle the significant nuances of severe mental illness.

You asking a person whether or not they are suicidal is not going to make someone carry out their plan – If anything, it will give the person an outlet to share their pain and no that someone cares. You need to be ready for whatever they and react without judgement. It can feel painful to hear a loved one wants to leave this life and you behind. However, with the significance of the illness in this moment, you can not make the situation about yourself and your feelings. This individual needs all the love and support you have to give.

Don’t try to fix the problem – Unless you are a trained professional with experience with mental illness and suicide, do not offer solutions. This is an area where people over step and can lead to hurting the person instead of helping. Seek professional counsel and advice. While a pastor may be a good support person, they do not have the medical treatment knowledge to give sound medical advice. 

Don’t tell the person to have more faith or pray harder, this is a measurable observable illness – Just as you wouldn’t tell a diabetic not to take their insulin or a person with vision impairment to take off their glasses while driving, mental illness of this severity needs chemical intervention. The brain neurotransmitter imbalances that lead to suicidal thoughts are measurable and observable on scans of the time. Their brain is not making enough of the chemicals needed to feel hope and joy. They are likely lacking in serotonin and dopamine. They may even need medication for mood stabilizing, if rapid changes in mood are triggering suicidal thoughts. Encourage medical intervention while continuing faith practices the person has always followed. They should not be abandoned but should also not be used to replace proper medical care. This illness is the same as heart disease, stroke, diabetes and other illnesses that we take medications for. Just because you can’t see the problem, doesn’t mean it is “all in their head.”

This person is not feeling pain and sadness like you are, you are not stronger than they are – Anyone is capable of feelings of suicide with the right combination of life events and chemical imbalances in the brain. When are trauma or significant life event occurs, the brain reroutes its pathways for preservation. Suicide is an extreme version of fight or flight. In this case, the brain is experiencing so much pain and anxiety it can not process it. Therefore, the brain tells the person to run but to an extreme. Death may feel like the only way to escape the unbearable hurt and their brain is reinforcing this belief. Your loved ones body is literally propelling them towards this option and it may consume their thoughts. 

You do not understand unless you have been there – Even the best psychiatrist has only read about the experience of suicidality and has only observed patients. Unless you are a survivor of a suicide attempt or a thought disorder that led to suicidal ideation, do not share what you think you know. It may lead to more harm than good. Sharing about another persons experience you read about does not help. Telling the person a story about someone that “had it worse” only leads to feelings of greater pain and frustration. It makes the individual feel like you are invalidating their experience.

If encourage you to share this today. You never know who may be experiencing pain and suicidal thoughts. You never know who may have a loved one who is struggling. This person is not selfish. They are sick, as you can be sick. Their illness is real and needs treatment. Do not abandon people suffering with mental illness or stigmatize them, it only makes them worse. Don’t try to fix them. That is not your job. Lay aside your feelings and judgments and try to approach them with love and acceptance. Validate their pain and be there for them in whatever capacity they will allow. If you loved one has attempted or is currently planning a suicide attempt and hasn’t received medical help. Get it for them today, you just may save their life.

Memorial Day

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Memorial Day

What is today?

Is it friends, burgers, beer

Is it an extra day off work

Is it flags, songs, tv specials

Is it clothes, decor, or facebook posts

Is it red, white, and blue

Is it eagles and airplanes

Is it parades and celebration

Should it be taken for granted

No

Today is tireless fighting into the night

Today is bombs and sniper fire

Today is bunkers muddy and cold

Today is fear that today may be your last

Today is loss, grief, pain

 

Today is a father, brother, sister, mom, wife gone too soon

Today is arms filled with a folded flag instead of the one you love

Today is taps and gun salutes

Today is the celebration of the ultimate sacrifice

Today is freedom

Today is a gift, even if its cost is unknown to most

Today is for freedom but it wasn’t free

Today is Memorial Day, a day to be honored and respected

Thank a veteran today. Go to the cemetery with flowers to lay on graves of service men and women. Call your marine, soldier, airman, and shipman. If nothing else, remember the sacrifice of those that were taken to soon. Be grateful for your freedom that wasn’t free. Sleep well tonight knowing all sacrificed, but some sacrificed all.

Goodbye Hospital

Leaving the psychiatric facility was relatively uneventful. After I started Risperdal, I started progressing towards stability more rapidly. In the first forty eight hours, I started to see glimpses of myself again. The side effects from Risperdal were overwhelming initially. The tremors, instability, and muscle weakness were terrifying. I, also, had cogwheeling. This is where your muscles grind and bounce like gears moving, rather than a smooth motion. I knew that these side effects had potential to be permanent. However, I started Benztropine and my symptoms improved within five days. As well, the physical tremors and muscle weakness began to dissipate within a few weeks. Initially, walking down stairs was difficult, but it improved as time passed. As soon as my symptoms were stable, I was able to leave the unit and return home. We stopped locally to make sure we had all of my prescriptions and, then, came home. 

April 27, 2016

“Transition to home has been smooth until now. Today was hard. I was experiencing fatigue, overwhelmed by little kids all talking at once, not feeling hungry. There are so many things to think about and do. The end of school is a very busy time. The yoga has really helped with my ability to relax. I am glad to be doing things with Brian. I became overwhelmed, which normally leads to anxiety but I transitioned to depression. I took a three hour nap and was refreshed. I think that how I was feeling before could have been hypomania. I was wanting to stop thinking about going to Disney world, but I couldn’t. As the depressive symptoms came in, I had no more energy. I didn’t think suicide felt as crazy. I wanted to curl up and sleep.”

Coming home was more difficult than I expected. I had improvement in the hospital, but there were no outside factors to impact my health. Now, I was back in the role of mother and wife. I had daytime babysitters, so that I could focus on my coping skills. It involved me sleeping all night, eating three meals a day, journaling, coloring the mandalas, having a quiet time with the Lord, and exercising. I had to stop exercising so intensely, as this often lead to increasing my mental intensity. I had to try as hard as possible to maintain a clam environment that was low stress. I would often do yoga, do ballet, or go swim laps. 

I found a local yoga studio and my husband and I began to go together. It was such a quiet and peaceful form of yoga. Power yoga and hot yoga were not in the realm of yoga types that helped with my anxiety. So, I devoted myself to a new form of exercise. Swimming was also helpful. Getting in the water and swimming without hearing anything else was so soothing. I would use the time to process my life and pray. It started to become a really sweet time. 

I started noticing myself becoming obsessed with activities or future goals. For me, Disney became a big focus. My family’s trip to Disney World had been one of the happiest weeks of my life. I found myself longing to feel those emotions again. Unfortunately, I became unable to let the idea go. It was neither financially feasible or physically possible at the time.  However, I had laser like focus and would speak of it all of the time. It felt as if the trip was vital to my survival. I couldn’t bear to hear from any detractors and this became a sour of pain and stress for myself and my family.

My marriage would also be affected by my illness. My relationship with my husband would change. It would be hard.

Where Did I Go – Part 2

You may have noticed that I have been missing. It has been an eventful few weeks. A day I had barely imagined three years ago finally arrived. My psychiatrist and I decided I was ready to wean off of my medications. I had first approached the subject with my husband. I thought I sounded a little crazy even suggesting it. I had just had some relapse symptoms two weeks before. I just had a feeling in my gut. I had never felt it before. As I sat in church three weeks ago, I felt the Lord speak to my heart. He told me this was the end. He spoke to me, told me I was ready to heal. It was the end of this suffering. When something like that happens, it is hard to process. I had resigned to my illness, stopped praying for healing. I had decided this was my cross to bear for the rest of my life. I had accepted it. Along with medication, a psychiatrist, and a counselor, I could do this forever. There would be good times and bad, but I was strong. I could survive it.

Then, it happened. That healing miracle moment. I can’t describe how it felt. In fact, I didn’t want to believe it. I felt silly, but empowered all at the same time. So, I decided to ask my psychiatrist if I could begin weaning off one medication in a few weeks, my Latuda. She suggested we start now. It was a surreal moment. I thought she would want to do it down the line. I even gave her that out, suggested that we start in a few months. She suggested I start now, if I was comfortable. I was excited but nervous. So, the plan was to come off 40 mg per month until I am completely Latuda free. Then, wean off the Zoloft. The thought being that my Latuda is an adjunct to my antidepressant. So, stepwise makes sense. Then, two weeks into my weaning I had another moment with the Lord.

I was sitting in church. It was a normal Sunday. Weaning off of the Latuda was going well, without any withdraw symptoms or psychiatric symptoms returning. Then, I felt that same feeling I had felt weeks before. The voice spoke to my heart and told me it was time to wean off of Zoloft cold turkey. I had trusted the Lord the first time and decided it was time to trust again. Unwisely, I did not contact my psychiatrist for fear she would tell me I had lost it. I highly recommend that anyone considering changing their medications consult with their doctors first. However, taking my own medical advice isn’t my strong suit. So, I began the weaning process. It was already Sunday. I had run out of my medication on Friday and my psychiatrist wasn’t responding to my refill request. After doing some reading about Zoloft, it has a rapid half-life. So, by day three, I was already down to a 12.5% blood level. I decided to not refill my prescription and one was never called in.

Weaning off Zoloft was much more difficult than weaning off Latuda. I now believe that some medication form a dependency similar to drugs. I didn’t realize, that after three years, I had become so dependent on this medication. My body literally depended on it to function normally. I began having severe dizziness and light headedness. It was so severe it was hard for me to drive or take care of my children. Then, my heart began to beat very weakly. I couldn’t feel my pulse in my wrist. It was barely palpable in my neck. It was nearly impossible for me to exercise due to an increasing strain on my heart. Then, there was lightening like pulsations that went through my body, accompanied by dizziness and a pounding in my ears. At first, these symptoms would strike every few seconds. With time, all but the lightening and pounding would resolve. By the end of the first week, the pounding was barely noticeable. I will say, on the other side, it was worth it. However, if I had to do it again, I would highly recommend weaning slowly. If I hadn’t felt like the Lord was telling me to wean cold turkey, I would have weaned in a tapered fashion to lessen the symptoms.

What I didn’t expect was the return of my emotions. I thought that I was so feeling while I was on my medication. I didn’t believe myself to be emotionally blunted in any way. I just described myself as calmer. Once the medication weaning began, I began to notice small changes. First, I began to become tearful over simple things. A mom started crying at school after he son received an award. After seeing her beaming with pride, I began to cry. This hadn’t happened in three years. Then, I began to experience joy again. I thought I had been feeling happiness but I realized it was as if I was joyful behind a fog. All my feelings were there, but they were just a shadow of the real thing. Something so simple as hugging my child or taking them to the zoo now brought a flow of emotion. I could actually feel the surge of feel good hormones that came from positive experiences with those I loved. What I was feeling before wasn’t reciprocal. I would interact and perform the act of hugging or loving but there was nothing after. I was living off feelings from my past experiences. There wasn’t any new serotonin or dopamine being released. I believe this to be why I was always striving towards the next experience to bring me joy but could never be satisfied in an experience. The positive feelings would last only moments. It didn’t matter what the size of the experience. A trip to Disney would have given me the same satisfaction that a hug from my child would. I would loose the warm fuzzy feelings within minutes. I would then go seeking those feelings again. I was insatiable. I have felt more satisfaction in one hug from my child now than in almost the entirety of my mental illness on my medications. I see now why some patients refuse to go back on their medications. The loss of emotion and feeling was greater than I had expected. There is definitely a sacrifice of self and personality that comes from taking medications like these.

All of this to say. I wouldn’t recommend that anyone go off of their medications early or without a doctor’s supervision. I will say, however, that I knew when I was ready. It was the first time I had ever even considered the possibility. I was deeply physical and mental attached to my medication regimen. I liked the stability that they offered. I feared that I would crash immediately upon weaning. This just wasn’t the case. The reason I am sharing this, is for the person who is ready to wean off medication but scared. I want to give you hope that there is good to be found in the moving forward. I am still not off all of my medication, I am not certain I will never need it again. What I can say is that it has served me well. All of my medications were needed and helpful. However, it is not good to be dependent on these medications forever. There is definitely a physical dependence that forms. As well, there is opportunity for joy and pleasure without the medications. I didn’t realize what I was missing. I didn’t realize the life and feelings that awaited me on my path to healing. I am so grateful for both.

I will say that my family, as a whole has been accepting and encouraging. However, my spouse does not share my joy and excitement. I didn’t see this coming. I expected to see me improving and rejoice. However, he has been through so much. He has watched me hanging over the side of the cliff and pulled me back. He has walked in both the darkness and light of mental illness with me. This emotional rollercoaster has proved too much. It is hard for him to hope in a future where I am well. He had lost hope that day would come. It has not been hard for him to see my joy and celebration of my new self as a euphoric episode. When we fight, he tells me to go back on my meds. When I am angry about something, he tells me to go back on my meds. Life without meds is scary. It represents another unknown future. We had come to know the future. The future was mental illness and medication. It was a future we were prepared for. This is a new beginning, another unknown. Remember the family members and loved ones of those with mental illness. This journey affects them too. They need help, they need support. They need encouragement. These changes are life altering for them as well. Even though his words hurt, I know that he will begin to see the light again. He will begin to let down his walls and let in our new life. A life with all of our feelings and emotions. It will take time. I need to be patient with him, as he has been patient with me, I need to see his suffering. It has been measurable and it matters. I can’t wait to share more of my story with you. I can’t wait to see what the future holds. The Lord has spoken to me about some other adventures that may lay ahead. The good news is I now believe there is a good future for me again. I am allowing myself to walking in the light of day and celebrate where I have been and where I am going. The Lord is and has been good in both the storm and the laughter. He is here.

Where Did I Go

Where did I go when I started my meds

My feelings, my emotions, myself

I didn’t know

I couldn’t see

I thought I was me

But I wasn’t

I was gone, absent, missing

I was numb, couldn’t feel

I saw but wasn’t present

I heard but couldn’t experience

My life, floating by like a dream

Then they were gone

The meds weaned away

The symptoms severe, the price barely worth paying

They held me in their grip

My body threatening me to go back

I couldn’t, I stayed strong, resisted

I could imagine, taste the other side

Vision blurred, mind scrambled, the meds clawing their way out

Then the storm broke

I felt it, like for the first time

Love, anger, joy, sadness

The emotions came strong and swift
I celebrated, couldn’t get enough

Then I was back

The part of me thought lost

I had been in their all along,

Hiding, now feeling, arriving back again

The Shack

I read the book while I was in inpatient treatment. The Shack was a wonderfully helpful book. It allowed me to breach the subject of God for the first time in a long time. I had really pushed God out of my mind. The only time I thought about my faith was to become angry and resentful. I no longer felt love and joy from my faith. Instead, I felt deceived and robbed of the faith I previously had. I no longer could relate to worship music. It felt fake to sing songs of praise and the songs about difficulty made me angry. I couldn’t believe people would sing these worship songs, as I myself had done so many times before. They sang of being willing to suffer, and still rejoice. They talked of hope despite pain. They talked of walking through the valley of the shadow of death and God meeting you there. I just couldn’t relate or I didn’t want to sing such words, as they may come true and things would get worse. I wanted to look God in the face and scream at him. I wanted to physically wrestle with him, hitting him with all my might and crying out. But I couldn’t feel it either way. I had become numb as a form of self preservation.

The Shack, however, opened the door back to my faith. It was non threatening, as it was fiction. It is a story written by a man who was a missionary kid and experienced horrible abuse and suffering as a child. He had written the story, The Shack, due to encouragement from his family. His story telling made God and suffering relatable. Mackenzie Phillips is a father whose daughter, Missy, is kidnapped and murdered by a serial killer, while they are on a camping trip. The death threatens the superficial faith his does posses and threatens to tear his family apart. The Great Sadness overtakes him and he can’t see anything else besides his pain. One day, he gets a letter in the mail to return to The Shack where his daughters body was found. He believes it may be from the killer and he sneaks off to The Shack for the weekend, while his family is away. While at The Shack, he encounters God, the Holy Spirit, and Jesus. Each of them play a different role in his healing.

God appears to Mac as a middle aged back woman. God decides to appear this way because he is neither male nor female. However, Macknezie grew up with an abusive father and God meets him as a woman to take on a nonthreatening form that will bring him comfort. As well, it is to show Mackenzie that he only thinks he knows who God really is. He view of God has been warped and skewed by his life experiences. Mac spends time with the Holy Spirit, gardening and realizing that though the garden appears a mess, from above, it is been turned into a beautiful pattern. He just cant see it because it is not his design. Jesus spends time carving in the woodshed and then takes Mac to see The Judge. She helps Mac to see that he is angry because he believes his own ways are right and good. However, he is biased and selfish. She shows him that Mac needs to forgive the killer for what he has done. Mac disagrees and wants to tell God to judge this man harshly. As an example, He asks Mac to choose which of his own children should go to hell, as they have sinned against Mac through lying, anger, withholding love, amongst other things. Mac resists the choice, finding the suggestion bogus. The Judge forces him to decide, since Mac seems to want to tell God what to do in his own life. Mac, finally, decides that he would rather go to hell himself than allow his children to pay the penalty of their own sin, because he loves them all. The Judge helps Mac to see God in the same light. Both Mac and the killer are God’s children. God wants redemption for all, he wishes that none should perish. That is why he gave his own life instead. Mac realizes that when we hold onto pain, hold it against God, and think our ways are better, we become trapped. We get bogged down in our grief. We have to learn to trust that the Lord loves us and everyone else. When we forgive others and ourselves, we walk into freedom.

At the end of the weekend, God takes Mac on a walk to find Missy’s body. They bring her back and bury her in the wooden box Jesus had carved and place her in the middle of the beautiful garden the Holy Spirit has created. Mac is able to forgive the killer and trust that God is for him.

Mac returns home and on the way back is in a car accident. When he wakes up in the hospital, he finds out that the car accident occurred on a Friday night and he never made it to The Shack. He, however, refutes this story and shares what happened with his family. In the end, he follows the markings God showed him in the woods. They lead to Missy. As a result, the police find the other girls whose bodies the killer had hidden. The killer is caught as well. In the end, Mac is able to forgive the killer and rest knowing that his child is safe with the Lord. He realizes that God never left him and his faith is changed forever. He becomes a free man and walks in a lighter spirit, as a result of his time at The Shack.

This story was so life bringing to me. I had spent so much time being angry at God. I was determined that his way was wrong, and was showing him to be unloving toward me. I had decided to be the judge in my situation, as well. I didn’t want to forgive the hospital staff for killing my brother and I didn’t want to trust the Lord that he was doing what was best for my life. That anger had separated my heart from embracing the love of Christ. It had drawn me deeper into a place of darkness, where I could no loner hear from the Lord. The destruction my anger had caused threatened my very life. After surrendering to God’s will and trusting in his love for me. I began to have a renewed spirit. A peace returned to my heart and mind, and I was able to begin seeking the Lord again.

Today is Mother’s Day

Today is Mother’s Day. A day filled with joy, love, happiness, laughter. A day of celebration. But not for you, today is a day of pain. Today is a day of sadness. While others smile, your heart is aching. While mother’s hold new babies. You heart is breaking. You are longing for chubby fingers and toes. You long for snuggles and arms that are full. Instead, you feel the emptiness. You feel unseen. You feel pain.

Today is Mother’s Day. A day filled with joy, love, happiness, laughter. A day of celebration. But not for you, today is a day of sadness. Your mom is gone. You heart has a hole. An empty space. The grave is your meeting place. Pictures, movies, and memories are all that are left. You miss her, want her near. You long for one more day together. One more hug, one more kiss, one more “I love you.” But there won’t be any. You pain feels too great to bear. The grief overwhelms.

Today is Mother’s Day. A day filled with joy, love, happiness, laughter. A day of celebration. But not for you, today is a day of suffering. You see mothers and children. You see their laughter, you see their love. But your heart can’t understand. Your mother wasn’t there. You were abandoned. You didn’t get to know. You didn’t get to see. There are no memories. Their is no longing for better days and better times. There is just the unknown, the abandon, the rejection.

Today is Mother’s Day. A day filled with joy, love, happiness, laughter. A day of celebration. But not for you, today is a day of sorrow. Your memories are filled with hurt and physical pain. There was yelling, hitting, fear. Your childhood was no childhood. There was no one there for you. The ones that were supposed to love you, protect you. They hurt you. They didn’t see your worth. You grew up too soon. Your suffering and pain were too great.

Today is Mother’s Day. A day filled with joy, love, happiness, laughter. A day of celebration. But not for you, today is a day of aching. While others celebrate their love with family, you feel lost. Yours is a day you wish could pass without incident. You do not want to want to go to church. You don’t want to put on a fake smile. You don’t want to pretend that this day is wonderful. You want to escape.

Know that you are seen. Your are known. Your story matters. You are not alone in your pain. We stand strong together, as a group of women. We are united in stories. You have value, you are to be celebratedfor who you are today. You are not defined by your history or circumstances. You are loved.

To You on Mother’s Day

You carried me,

combed my hair,

snuggled in when days were hard,

You wiped my tears and spoke kind words,

carried me when I was too weak to stand,

You stayed up late,

clothed me in love,

held my hand,

sang me songs,

You tucked me in,

You held me tight,

made my lunches,

educated me,

You walked with me through dark days,

You bought my prom dress

planned my wedding,

gave me courage when I had none,

You held my babies,

wiped away my tears,

You were there for me when others won’t,

You sacrificed yourself, devoted your life to mine,

You grew me, raised me, set me free to fly,

You were and are my biggest fan and best friend,
You gave me all you had,

You are mine

This Mother’s Day, mom, I want you to know how much I appreciate you. You have given me all of you. You have been my rock and my best friend. You are my constant. I love you more than words can express. This day and all days, I love you.

Love,
Your Daughter